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Acute endocrine presentations in general practice

Iodine-induced thyroid disease

Angela McPhee, Christian Girgis, Bernard Champion

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© BSIP/B.BOISSONNET/MEDICAL IMAGES MODELS USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY
© BSIP/B.BOISSONNET/MEDICAL IMAGES MODELS USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY

Abstract

The immediate management and investigation  of an acute endocrine presentation in general practice is discussed in this section. It is  inspired by, but not based on, a real patient situation.

Article Extract

Amanda, a previously healthy 50-year-old woman, presents for the first time to you, her GP, with recent onset of palpitations, anxiety and insomnia. On further questioning, she says she has not had any chest pain, dyspnoea or headaches. She has noticed an increased frequency in bowel motions but no nausea or abdominal discomfort. She has lost a significant amount of weight (about 20 kg) in the past six months. She does not have a fever, and a screen for infective symptoms is negative. She is also concerned about a sudden increase in hair loss.

Figures

© BSIP/B.BOISSONNET/MEDICAL IMAGES MODELS USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY
© BSIP/B.BOISSONNET/MEDICAL IMAGES MODELS USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY